About UPAEP Libraries

The network/LRC

Learning Resource Centre

The UPAEP Libraries belong in its structure to a collegiate body called LRC, Learning and Research Resource Center, which is part of the General Directorate of Academic Support of the UPAEP.

Libraries are considered within our university environment as spaces for reflection and expression; they are dedicated to building this environment on a daily basis by supporting the substantive functions of teaching, research and extension. They are dedicated to building this environment on a daily basis by supporting the substantive functions of teaching, research and extension.

Libraries, as an important link in the chain of human communication, become a great cohesive force, at a time when social cohesion is of vital importance. While the media are declarative, libraries provide an environment of permanent reflection, where a variety of issues are analyzed and raised, hoping to find answers and alternative solutions to the problems of man, society and the implications of globalization and scientific, technological and cultural development.

Libraries are perceived as a living and dynamic place where the university community gathers, brings together its culture, organizes its memory and finds meaning for the development it expects in the future. Libraries are a fundamental environment for the development of academic activity.

In this sense, the ultimate purpose of the library network is the recovery, collection, analysis, organization, classification and dissemination of information. But not all or any information, but that which supports the professional and human formation of students; that which helps to identify the needs and social problems; that which allows differentiating the alternatives and methods of solution; that which keeps the knowledge of reality current; that which records the development of science and culture; primarily, that which is consigned in the current university curriculum.

Central Library

Karol Wojtyla

Dedicated to Karol Wojtyla

On Friday, September 23, 2011, the plaque of Karol Wojtyla - John Paul II was unveiled inside the Library of our university, which from that date has been named after the Saint, thus highlighting the work of his pontificate in promoting the dialogue of Faith and Culture.

We recall that "the pilgrim pope" chose as the destination of the first of his more than one hundred pastoral trips outside Italy, the city of Puebla de los Angeles, where he inaugurated the work of the third general conference of the Latin American Episcopate. His extraordinary intellectual capacity as a theologian, philosopher and mystic was reflected in various works, some written in his youth, such as Love and Responsibility. As Pontiff he published five books of a personal nature, and as Pastor and Teacher, fourteen encyclicals, fifteen apostolic exhortations, eleven apostolic constitutions (among which is Excorde Eclesiae on Catholic universities) and forty-five apostolic letters.

By his stature as a statesman, promoter of peace and unconditional defender of human dignity, John Paul II became the main reference for the hope of a better world among believers and non-believers.

Karol Josef Wojtyla was born in Wadowice, Poland, on May 18, 1920. He lost his mother at the age of nine and his only brother at the age of eighteen. In the company of his father, who always guided him on the path of faith and Christian love, he moved to Krakow to begin his studies at the Jagiellonian University. In that city they were surprised by the invasion of the Nazi and Soviet armies in September 1939. The Germans closed the University and young Karol had to work as a laborer in a quarry and then in a chemical factory. In 1941 his father died, leaving him completely alone and without a family. Jan Tyranowski, a tailor in Krakow, introduced him to the spirituality of St. John of the Cross.

In 1943, still under Nazi invasion, he entered the underground seminary in Krakow and at the end of the war he was ordained to the priesthood by the Cardinal Archbishop of Krakow, Adam Stefan Sapieha, in his private chapel on November 1, 1946. At the end of the war he studied in Rome, where he obtained a doctorate in theology with the thesis The act of faith in the doctrine of St. John of the Cross. In 1948 he returned to Poland as vicar of the parish of St. Florian; simultaneously he was a professor at the Faculty of Theology of the Jagiellonian University and advisor to the students of that University with whom he organized frequent excursions, despite the objections of the communist authorities. In 1954 he was appointed Professor of Moral Theology and Social Ethics at the Faculty of Philosophy of the Catholic University of Lublin. On July 4, 1958, Pope Pius XII consecrated him Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Krakow and on December 30, 1963, Pope Paul VI appointed him Archbishop of Krakow. He actively participated in the Second Vatican Council and in 1965 he was called to the Congregations for the Sacraments, Catholic Education and the Council for the Laity. On May 29, 1967, at the age of 47, he was elevated to the dignity of cardinal. Upon the death of John Paul I on October 16, 1978, Cardinal Karol Wojtyla was elected successor of St. Peter, taking the name Johannes Paulus pp II. At 58 years of age, John Paul II was the youngest pope of the 20th century.

John Paul II's pontificate - the third longest in the history of the Church - brought about transcendental changes not only within the Christian world but throughout the world, always affirmed by the conviction of his faith, launched as a slogan in St. Peter's Square on the very day of his election: "DO NOT BE AFRAID, OPEN, OPEN WIDE OPEN THE DOORS TO CHRIST!

That faith soon infected millions of people and led his compatriots to form the Solidarity trade union that challenged and buried the Marxist tyranny in Poland, thus initiating the collapse of the infamous "iron curtain". All indications are that the leaders of the Soviet Union ordered the assassination of John Paul II, which led to the bombing of St. Peter's Square on May 13, 1981. However, the Pope survived his wounds and continued to defend the freedom and dignity of peoples subjugated by communist totalitarianism. The last leader of the USSR, Mikhail Gorbachev, acknowledged, "Everything that has happened in Eastern Europe in recent years would have been impossible without the Pope's efforts."

Known as "the pilgrim pope", he chose as the destination of the first of his more than one hundred pastoral trips outside Italy the city of Puebla de los Angeles, where he inaugurated the work of the third general conference of the Latin American Episcopate. His extraordinary intellectual capacity as a theologian, philosopher and mystic was reflected in various works, some written in his youth, such as Love and Responsibility. As Pontiff he published five books of a personal nature, and as Pastor and Teacher, fourteen encyclicals, fifteen apostolic exhortations, eleven apostolic constitutions (among which is Excorde Eclesiae on Catholic universities) and forty-five apostolic letters.

By his stature as a statesman, promoter of peace and unconditional defender of human dignity, John Paul II became the main reference of hope for a better world among believers and non-believers. He died in Rome on April 2, 2005. John Paul II "the great" was beatified in Rome on May 1, 2011 and canonized on April 27, 2014.